8th of 10 Shuffleboard Articles.

HANDLING TYPICAL SITUATIONS

1) If your opponent has two discs scoring – try for the nearest one, hitting it at the correct angle to push out the second one, too. (A carom.)

2) If the choice is to guard your own scoring disc, or go in for a second score – set up a guard. Patience pays off!

Note:

  • A guard should stop at least 5 feet in front of the disc it is guarding – check from your opponent’s viewpoint before deciding on the exact spot.
  • Too many games are lost because of a poorly placed guard. 3) When your opponent’s score is guarded – aim a hard shot at the guard – with a little luck, you could get the scoring disc, also.

Note:

  • It is poor policy to ignore a guarded score and try for one of your own. Remove the guard, even if you don’t have the hammer.
  • This is a tough decision missed by many beginners. MAKING THE RIGHT SHOT

Decide what you really want to accomplish before each shot, then use the proper speed.

Some examples:

  • A take-out has to be hard enough to move both discs out completely.
  • A guard shot can still be effective if short, but it is useless if too far in.
  • A perfect try for a score in the “10” area is the ultimate; but, if you err, it is nice to be long for an “8.”
  • In the Central District of the FSA, we used to call this shot a Fred Wilkins 10!!

– 14-

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4 Responses to 8th of 10 Shuffleboard Articles.

  1. joan wheeler says:

    I dont want any changes. i have a reason to keep my shuffleboard news ads is because i played this game in Fla. for years and is one of the top pllayers………………….

    Like

  2. Earl A Ball says:

    We called it a Fred Wilkins 8 if it stopped in the 10. It happened often enough that it caught our attention.
    Earl

    Like

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